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Aleve

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Aleve was approved by the FDA as an over-the-counter drug in 1994.

The FDA distributed a warning to consumers of the over-the-counter pain reliever naproxen after federal researchers established an increased amount of heart attacks and strokes among users. The warning followed recent research linking two prescription arthritis drugs to cardiovascular problems.

Naproxen, advertised under the brand name Aleve, was part of an analysis by the National Institutes of Health into whether naproxen or the arthritis drug Celebrex can be used to treat Alzheimer's disease. NIH researchers stopped the survey after finding people who took naproxen were 50 percent more probable to have heart attacks or strokes.

An Alzheimer's disease prevention trial was suspended after researchers said there were more heart attacks and strokes among patients taking naproxen, an over-the-counter pain reliever in use for 28 years and commonly known under the brand name Aleve.

The research, involving around 2,500 individuals, was to test whether naproxen or Celebrex, both pain relievers, could decrease the risk of Alzheimer's disease among healthy elderly patients who were at an increased risk of the disease.

In another new study, researchers revealed that individuals who take both Naproxen (Aleve) and the osteoporosis drug Alendronate have a higher risk of developing stomach ulcers.

Another recent study states that naproxen has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular complications. It is still unclear from preliminary evidence the exact statistical significance of these naproxen findings. What researchers do know is that the 50 naproxen patients who suffered adverse cardiovascular events in the clinical trial were over the age of seventy and were taking doses of naproxen that were equal to the standard over-the-counter dose of naproxen.

 

The FDA distributed a warning to consumers of the over-the-counter pain reliever naproxen after federal researchers established an increased amount of heart attacks and strokes among users. The warning followed recent research linking two prescription arthritis drugs to cardiovascular problems.

Naproxen, advertised under the brand name Aleve, was part of an analysis by the National Institutes of Health into whether naproxen or the arthritis drug Celebrex can be used to treat Alzheimer's disease. NIH researchers stopped the survey after finding people who took naproxen were 50 percent more probable to have heart attacks or strokes.

An Alzheimer's disease prevention trial was suspended after researchers said there were more heart attacks and strokes among patients taking naproxen, an over-the-counter pain reliever in use for 28 years and commonly known under the brand name Aleve.

The research, involving around 2,500 individuals, was to test whether naproxen or Celebrex, both pain relievers, could decrease the risk of Alzheimer's disease among healthy elderly patients who were at an increased risk of the disease.

In another new study, researchers revealed that individuals who take both Naproxen (Aleve) and the osteoporosis drug Alendronate have a higher risk of developing stomach ulcers.